How does coronavirus kill? Clinicians trace a ferocious rampage through the body, from brain to toes

How does coronavirus kill? Clinicians trace a ferocious rampage through the body, from brain to toes

As the number of confirmed cases of COVID-19 surges past 2.2 million globally and deaths surpass 150,000, clinicians and pathologists are struggling to understand the damage wrought by the coronavirus as it tears through the body. They are realizing that although the lungs are ground zero, its reach can extend to many organs including the heart and blood vessels, kidneys, gut, and brain.

“[The disease] can attack almost anything in the body with devastating consequences,” says cardiologist Harlan Krumholz of Yale University and Yale-New Haven Hospital, who is leading multiple efforts to gather clinical data on COVID-19. “Its ferocity is breathtaking and humbling.
If the immune system doesn’t beat back SARS-CoV-2 during this initial phase, the virus then marches down the windpipe to attack the lungs, where it can turn deadly. The thinner, distant branches of the lung’s respiratory tree end in tiny air sacs called alveoli, each lined by a single layer of cells that are also rich in ACE2 receptors.

Striking the heart

In Brescia, Italy, a 53-year-old woman walked into the emergency room of her local hospital with all the classic symptoms of a heart attack, including telltale signs in her electrocardiogram and high levels of a blood marker suggesting damaged cardiac muscles. Further tests showed cardiac swelling and scarring, and a left ventricle—normally the powerhouse chamber of the heart—so weak that it could only pump one-third its normal amount of blood. But when doctors injected dye in the coronary arteries, looking for the blockage that signifies a heart attack, they found none. Another test revealed why: The woman had COVID-19.

Buffeting the brain

Another striking set of symptoms in COVID-19 patients centers on the brain and central nervous system. Frontera says neurologists are needed to assess 5% to 10% of coronavirus patients at her hospital. But she says that “is probably a gross underestimate” of the number whose brains are struggling, especially because many are sedated and on ventilators.

Reaching the gut

In early March, a 71-year-old Michigan woman returned from a Nile River cruise with bloody diarrhea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. Initially doctors suspected she had a common stomach bug, such as Salmonella. But after she developed a cough, doctors took a nasal swab and found her positive for the novel coronavirus. A stool sample positive for viral RNA, as well as signs of colon injury seen in an endoscopy, pointed to a gastrointestinal (GI) infection with the coronavirus, according to a paper posted online in The American Journal of Gastroenterology (AJG).

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Lifeboat Foundation Safeguarding humanity

Lifeboat Foundation Safeguarding humanity

Happy to have been in 5 Boards of Lifeboat Foundation for many years now. The Lifeboat Foundation is a nonprofit nongovernmental organization dedicated to encouraging scientific advancements while helping humanity survive existential risks and possible misuse of increasingly powerful technologies, including genetic engineering, nanotechnology, and robotics/AI, as we move towards the Singularity.

Lifeboat Foundation is pursuing a variety of options, including helping to accelerate the development of technologies to defend humanity such as new methods to combat viruses, effective nanotechnological defensive strategies, and even self-sustaining space colonies in case the other defensive strategies fail.

Please see their news on Coron Virus.

https://lifeboat.com/news.cgi?212#coronavirus-update-iii

https://lifeboat.com/ex/bios.lakshman.madurasinghe

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Historial Ravana

Historial Ravana

The latest scientific evidence shared by Discovery channel two days ago shows that Ram-Sethu bridge was a man made structure that had been built around 7000 years ago.
http://www.timesnownews.com/india/video/ramayana-fact-or-fable-us-tv-show-suggests-that-ram-setu-was-man-made/145227
This opens up the subject afresh and I share some thoughts I expressed about historical Ravana a few years ago.
Sri Lanka is at a point of transition. The resultant collective consciousness will provide an ideal platform to critically re-examine certain historical and cultural assumptions carried over the years and a willingness to open to a paradigm shift in thinking. It is natural when critical scholarship progresses, new names, places, and traditions will emerge challenging hitherto accepted views. This is an inevitable aspect of growth and progress if we embrace them with a spirit of humility and transcend the barriers of petty partisan polemics.
Read more…………..
https://www.facebook.com/notes/lakshman-madurasinghe/my-foreword-to-historical-ravana-published-a-few-years-ago/10154968237175736/

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How to Adopt a Sound Bedtime Routine

How to Adopt a Sound Bedtime Routine

How to Adopt a Sound Bedtime Routine

How to Adopt a Sound Bedtime Routine How to Adopt a Sound Bedtime Routine No matter what condition you’re currently in, it’s highly probable that the imposed lockdown due to the coronavirus has had an impact on your mental health.

In my case, the never-ending flow of news articles about new cases and deaths, the unstoppable forwards in WhatsApp groups with so much fake news, and the prognostic on yet another financial crisis have increased my anxiety to a point where I can’t sleep. I’ve discussed this with several friends who’ve experienced the same feelings, and they suggested I should take medications or CBD oils.

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How Do I Focus on Work When Everything Happening in the World Is so Stressful?

How Do I Focus on Work When Everything Happening in the World Is so Stressful?

Do you have any tips on how to focus on work when everything happening in the world is so stressful?

Today’s work and life environment is incredibly stressful, which makes it hard to stay focused and avoid being overwhelmed by unproductive fear. Every time we turn on the media, we hear about the devastation the COVID virus is causing and see people who are suffering. Most of us are now physically isolated, trying to navigate relationships and new routines from our home as grim news surrounds us.

During these challenging times, it’s difficult to stay productive and innovative and yet it is critical. Turning our mind to work and being able to keep building toward the future—despite all the uncertainty that faces us in the present—will help us stay calm and in a growth mindset, which is what we all need to move forward.

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Article: This Outdoor Meditation Is Great For Those With Limited Access to Nature

This Outdoor Meditation Is Great For Those With Limited Access to Nature

Staying home can mean lots of screen time and not a ton of fresh air — this sort of imbalance could be contributing to that tension headache, anxiety, and stress you may be feeling. If your space safely allows, a quick way to recoup is connecting with nature for a few minutes, but you can maximiz…

https://flip.it/OYMzPA

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Leading from the engine room amidst the fog engulfing the crow’s nest

Leading from the engine room amidst the fog engulfing the crow’s nest

Expert opinion of Prof. Madurasinghe – EDU Brussels

I had the good fortune of recording the expert opinion of Prof. Dr Lakshman Madurasinghe, Chairman, Academy of Universal Global Peace (AUGP) USA in Sri Lanka and Senior Governor – AUGP USA and an academic board member – EDU Brussels, the intergovernmental organisation accredited to European Parliament in charge of tertiary education worldwide, on his recommended leadership model in a critical hour such as this.

Dr. Madurasinghe is an Attorney-at-Law, behavioural scientist, educationist, thought leader, strategist and author of four books. He is pioneer of the e-consciousness based model of Therapeutic Jurisprudence and Master Memory Programme. He is also the founder of the International Institute of Theological Studies, Arabian Gulf (1990). Here is what he has to say:

“Very often we look at competence and think, ‘oh sure, if this person knows his trade, has the skills to perform, it would suffice’. The brain has many regions and activating one area would not help function in an integrated way. To function holistically, there are many more areas to take into account that need to be added to competence. There is a need to have a micro and a macro perspective.

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Recent TV interview at Sirasa

Recent TV interview at Sirasa

Speaking on 17th Feb 2020 at Sirasa Jeevithayata Ida Denna–ජීවිතයට ඉඩදෙන්න– program from 7 am LIVE on education reforms and the value of aesthetic education for primary levels. I explained the Multiple Intelligence -MI- concepts of Howard Gardner and 4 stages of Piaget .

United Nations Sustainable Development Goal 4: specifically targets quality education and Aesthetic Education which incorporates the arts across the curriculum in a way that fosters a heightened awareness of and an appreciation for all that touches our lives. It is a way of regaining touch with the process of learning something new, of being introduced to a medium never known in a particular way before.

Traditionally we focus most of our attention on linguistic and logical-mathematical intelligence. However, Multiple Intelligence studies have shown that we should also place equal attention on individuals who show gifts in the other intelligences: the artists, architects, musicians, naturalists, designers, dancers and so on. Unfortunately, many children who have these gifts have not been provided with such opportunities and we believe your efforts will help open a new window of opportunity to brighten the lives of Sri Lankan youth of the future.

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A delicate dance of dynamic changes in the conscious brain

A delicate dance of dynamic changes in the conscious brain

Imagine you’re at work: you’re focused on a task when suddenly your mind starts to wander to thoughts of the weekend–that is, until you catch your boss walking by out of the corner of your eye. This back and forth in consciousness happens naturally and automatically and is the result of two brain states: the dorsal attention network (DAT), which corresponds with our awareness of the environment around us and the default-mode network (DMN), which corresponds with an inward focus on ourselves.

Brain researchers consider these states to be anti-correlated, meaning when one is active, the other is suppressed. Michigan Medicine researchers studying consciousness have provided proof of this phenomenon using fMRI and illustrate, using a unique method, the ever-changing nature of the brain, even when under anesthesia or otherwise unresponsive.

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The Language You Speak Influences Where Your Attention Goes

The Language You Speak Influences Where Your Attention Goes

Psycholinguistics is a field at the intersection of psychology and linguistics, and one if its recent discoveries is that the languages we speak influence our eye movements. For example, English speakers who hear candle often look at a candy because the two words share their first syllable. Research with speakers of different languages revealed that bilingual speakers not only look at words that share sounds in one language but also at words that share sounds across their two languages. When Russian-English bilinguals hear the English word marker, they also look at a stamp, because the Russian word for stamp is marka.

Even more stunning, speakers of different languages differ in their patterns of eye movements when no language is used at all. In a simple visual search task in which people had to find a previously seen object among other objects, their eyes moved differently depending on what languages they knew. For example, when looking for a clock, English speakers also looked at a cloud. Spanish speakers, on the other hand, when looking for the same clock, looked at a present, because the Spanish names for clock and present—reloj and regalo—overlap at their onset.

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Sleep allows immune cells to do maintenance work on the brain

Sleep allows immune cells to do maintenance work on the brain

Studies have shown that during sleep, the brain reactualizes, updating memories, and clearing up “waste.” New research in mouse models suggests that specialized immune cells keep the brain in good working order by maintaining it during sleep.

New research in mice shows that immune cells are better able to perform maintenance work on the brain during sleep.

Research conducted over the past few years has uncovered evidence that the brain gets a chance to refresh and update in many ways during sleep.

For instance, scientists have learned that the brain consolidates newly formed memories during sleep. They have also discovered that sleep provides an excellent opportunity to take out the neural “trash.”

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Heart attack risk higher in those who sleep too little or too much

Heart attack risk higher in those who sleep too little or too much

The right amount of sleep is protective of heart health. This was the conclusion of new research that found sleep duration can influence a person’s risk of heart attack, regardless of other heart risk factors, including genetic ones.

New research tracks sleep duration and a person’s risk of a heart attack.

In a recent Journal of the American College of Cardiology paper, scientists from the United States and the United Kingdom describe how they analyzed sleep habits and medical records of 461,347 people aged 40–69 years living in the U.K.

The data, which came from the UK Biobank, included self-reports of how many hours participants habitually slept per night and health records covering 7 years. It also included results of tests for risk genes.

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