Iatrogenic Disease: The 3rd Most Fatal Disease in the USA

Iatrogenic Disease: The 3rd Most Fatal Disease in the USA

Iatrogenic Disease is defined as a disease that is caused by medical treatment. Read major headlines around the globe on this serious disease.

How Prepared are You to Not Become a National Statistic?

If a Jumbo Jet crashed and killed 280 people everyday… 365 days a year… year after year… would you be concerned about flying??

Would you question the Federal Aviation Administration? Would you demand answers??

Think about it!

Close to 100,000 people dying every year from plane crashes?

Sounds Ridiculous??!!

Well think again. What if you were told that over 100,000 people are killed and over 2 million people maimed and disabled every year…year after year from modern medicine…would you believe it??

Well these may be my words…but read the following articles from the most respected medical journals and institutions (Journal of the American Medical Association, Harvard University, Centers for Disease Control, British medical journal The Lancet, New England Journal of Medicine and national news (New York Times, Washington Post, CNN, US World Report) and you be the judge.

Writing in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), Dr. Starfield has documented the tragedy of the traditional medical paradigm in the following statistics:

Iatrogenic Disease: The 3rd Most Fatal Disease in the USA

* The term iatrogenic is defined as “induced in a patient by a physician’s activity, manner, or therapy. Used especially to pertain to a complication of treatment.” Furthermore, these estimates of death due to error are lower than those in a recent Institutes of Medicine report.

If the higher estimates are used, the deaths due to iatrogenic causes would range from 230,000 to 284,000.

Even at the lower estimate of 225,000 deaths per year, this constitutes the third leading cause of death in the U.S.

Dr. Starfield offers several caveats in the interpretations of these numbers:

First, most of the data are derived from studies in hospitalized patients.

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Why do people laugh in their sleep?

Why do people laugh in their sleep?

Laughing during sleep, or hypnogely, is relatively common and is not usually anything to worry about. In most cases, researchers believe that the cause is laughing at a dream during rapid eye movement sleep, which is entirely harmless.

In some cases, sleep laughing has links to sleep disorders. In rare cases, hypnogely can be a symptom of a neurological disorder.

Although Sigmund Freud and other prominent psychoanalysts have attributed sleep laughing to an unconscious manifestation of primal instincts and fears, experts dismiss this theory as not being entirely credible. Is it normal?

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Time for Understanding Time in the Brain

Time for Understanding Time in the Brain

“Time is passing too fast!” Many of us use that phrase every day when we feel like our kids are growing up fast or when a deadline sneaks up on us. When Virginie van Wassenhove hears that phrase, it conjures an entirely different point of view. She goes straight to consciousness, musing on how we perceive reality.

“When it comes to time, we tend to use linguistic shortcuts that may abuse the state of reality and fundamentally bias the way we think about time and the way scientists conceptualize issues related to time,” she says. “I am interested in understanding how the slow time scales of squishy matter afford us to assign meaning to reality.”

A cognitive neuroscientist at CEA and INSERM in Paris, van Wassenhove is working to understand the neural underpinnings of time. She has organized a symposium on the topic at the Cognitive Neuroscience Society (CNS) annual meeting in San Francisco this month — featuring scientists who are exploring evidence of how we construct mental models of time. Click to read

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Does herpes cause Alzheimer’s?

Does herpes cause Alzheimer’s?

Summary: The herpes simplex virus 1, the virus responsible for cold sores, may account for 50% of Alzheimer’s disease cases. HSV1 causes protein deposits which are characteristic of Alzheimer’s disease. Findings also reveal antiviral treatments can help to reduce the risk of developing Alzheimer’s in those with HSV1.

Source: Frontiers

What causes Alzheimer’s disease? The answer could be right under our noses, says leading expert Professor Ruth Itzhaki. Her latest paper presents a lifetime of research evidence that the herpes virus responsible for cold sores can also cause Alzheimer’s – and new data which show antiviral drugs drastically reduce the risk of senile dementia in patients with severe herpes infections. The review in Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience raises the tantalizing prospect of a simple, effective preventive treatment for one of humanity’s costliest disorders.

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Link Between Psychiatric Disorders and Events During Prenatal Development Identified

Link Between Psychiatric Disorders and Events During Prenatal Development Identified

Summary: A new study reports genetic variants that are critical for the development of the brain during fetal development are also frequently found in psychiatric disorders.

Source: Aarhus University.

Particular genetic variants in the human genome that are important for the development of the brain early in the life of the foetus are frequently found in psychiatric disorders. This is shown by a study carried out by iPSYCH.

Researchers studied a total of eight million genetic variants and in connection with this they found that a number of these variants occur particularly often in people who have one of more of the following psychiatric disorders: schizophrenia, depression, bipolar disorder, autism and ADHD.

This background is provided by Professor Thomas Werge from the Mental Health Services & University of Copenhagen and the Lundbeck Foundation’s Initiative for Integrated Psychiatric Research, commonly referred to as iPSYCH, which has received a total of DKK 361 million in funding from the Lundbeck Foundation. He explains:

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A Fascinating Sign Of High IQ

A Fascinating Sign Of High IQ

This sleep pattern is linked to stronger reasoning and better analytical and conceptual thinking.

Despite higher intelligence, night owls tend to get slightly worse grades in school.

This may be because the school day starts too early for them.

Morning types who rise early, also known as ‘larks’, tend to do around 8% better in school.

Later in life, though, the higher intelligence of night owls tends to shine through.

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Want to Innovate? Science Says, “Be A Nonconformist!”

Want to Innovate? Science Says, “Be A Nonconformist!”

Creativity is a process of making something unique and useful, and this process can lead to innovation. Unique creations require flexibility of thought and skills to entertain and develop uncommon ideas, which are borne out of differing opinions, not consensus. Remarkable ideas that supersede current knowledge flourish in the presence of diverse intellectual perspectives where conformity and status quo are challenged. A diverse group can create distinctive ideas, drawing on the variety of experiences from different backgrounds, thoughts, views, and skills. Intellectual diversity, a multiplicity of ideas, philosophies, and perspectives, is the main contributor to creativity and innovation. However, when you are in a climate where intellectual diversity is not valued, you may be mistaken for a troublemaker. Notable innovators in history thought and behaved differently from others and were nonconformists. They were often misunderstood or seen as troublemakers, such as Click to read

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How Modern Life Is Changing Our IQs and Problem-solving Skills

Synopsis- How Modern Life Is Changing Our IQs and Problem-solving Skills

Our brains have been getting smarter in response to modern life, but a surprising new study suggests the trend may have peaked. So how can you maximise your thinking?

Can you solve this problem? You have a wolf, a goat and a cabbage, and you need to get all three across a river in one piece. You have a boat, but it’s so small that it can fit only you and one of the items, and you can’t leave the wolf and the goat or the goat and the cabbage alone together. How do you get them all across?

This classic logic puzzle is at least a thousand years old. It is attributed to Alcuin of York, a medieval poet and scholar who died in 804, though it probably circulated in oral form before then. There’s another version with a fox, a goose and a bag of beans, and a related tale about three lascivious (but jealous) husbands and their wives who must also be ferried across a river without any hanky-panky on the boat or the shore.

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Synesthesia: Hearing colors and tasting sounds

Synesthesia: Hearing colors and tasting sounds

Can you taste sounds or visualize symphonies of color whenever you hear a song? If your answer to these is “yes,” you may have a wonderful condition known as synesthesia, which you share with many great artists, writers, and musicians.

By his own account, Nabokov saw each letter in different colors, despite the fact that text was printed all-black on white paper.

Interestingly, both his wife and his son shared this fascinating ability, though they each saw different palettes of color for the alphabet.

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Neurons Can Carry More Than One Signal at a Time

Neurons Can Carry More Than One Signal at a Time

Summary: A new study reveals a single neuron is capable of encoding information from two different sounds by switching between signals associated with one sound to that of the other.

Back in the early days of telecommunications, engineers devised a clever way to send multiple telephone calls through a single wire at the same time. Called time-division multiplexing, this technique rapidly switches between sending pieces of each message.

New research from Duke University shows that neurons in the brain may be capable of a similar strategy.

In an experiment examining how monkeys respond to sound, a team of neuroscientists and statisticians found that a single neuron can encode information from two different sounds by switching between the signal associated with one sound and the signal associated with the other sound.

“The question we asked is, how do neurons preserve information about two different stimuli in the world at one time?” said Jennifer Groh, professor in the department of psychology and neuroscience, and in the department of neurobiology at Duke.

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2 Personality Traits That Indicate High Intelligence

2 Personality Traits That Indicate High Intelligence

Introverts who have more stable personalities have higher levels of general knowledge, research finds. These two personality factors, along with being open to experience, predict people’s general knowledge.

General knowledge — or as psychologists call it, crystallised intelligence — is one of two broad aspects of intelligence.

General knowledge is often linked to success in life because innate talent is not enough — application matters. The other type is called ‘fluid intelligence’, and refers to abstract reasoning and the speed at which the brain works.

The conclusions come from a survey of 201 university students in the UK.

All were given tests of the five major aspects of personality: neuroticism, extraversion, openness to experience, agreeableness and conscientiousness.

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Fundamental Rule of Brain Plasticity Discovered

Fundamental Rule of Brain Plasticity Discovered

Our brains are famously flexible, or “plastic,” because neurons can do new things by forging new or stronger connections with other neurons. But if some connections strengthen, neuroscientists have reasoned, neurons must compensate lest they become overwhelmed with input. In a new study in Science, researchers at the Picower Institute for Learning and Memory at MIT demonstrate for the first time how this balance is struck: when one connection, called a synapse, strengthens, immediately neighboring synapses weaken based on the action of a crucial protein called Arc.

Senior author Mriganka Sur said he was excited but not surprised that his team discovered a simple, fundamental rule at the core of such a complex system as the brain, where 100 billion neurons each have thousands of ever-changing synapses. He likens it to how a massive school of fish can suddenly change direction, en masse, so long as the lead fish turns and every other fish obeys the simple rule of following the fish right in front of it.

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Waves Move Across the Human Brain to Support Memory

Waves Move Across the Human Brain to Support Memory

Summary: Alpha and theta oscillations move rhythmically across the brain, reflecting neural activity propagating across the cortex to help form working memory, a new study reports.

Source: Columbia University.

The coordination of neural activity across widespread brain networks is essential for human cognition. Researchers have long assumed that oscillations in the brain, commonly measured for research purposes, brain-computer interfacing, and clinical tests, were stationary signals that occurred independently at separate brain regions. Biomedical engineers at Columbia Engineering have discovered a new fundamental feature of brain oscillations: they actually move rhythmically across the brain, reflecting patterns of neuronal activity that propagate across the cortex. The study was published today in Neuron.

“We also found that these traveling waves moved more reliably when subjects performed well while performing a working memory task,” says Joshua Jacobs, assistant professor of biomedical engineering and senior author of the paper. “This indicates that traveling waves are significant for memory and cognition–our findings show that these oscillations are an important mechanism for large-scale coordination in the human brain.”

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Study: Weekend Sleep-Ins May Help You Live Longer

Study: Weekend Sleep-Ins May Help You Live Longer

New research is trying to put to bed the idea that too little sleep during weekdays can’t be counteracted by a longer sleep during weekends.

A study of nearly 40,000 people showed that for people younger than 65, getting an average of 5 hours or less of sleep per night over the weekend increased the odds of death by 52%, compared with getting at least 7 hours of sleep.

Having short sleep on both the weekdays and weekend, as well as having long sleep at both times, also raised the risk in this age group.

But the death rate among people who got less sleep during week and more sleep on the weekends did not differ a whole lot from those who averaged 7 hours per night.

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New Parts of the Brain Become Active After Students Learn Physics

New Parts of the Brain Become Active After Students Learn Physics

Summary: A neuroimaging study reveals brain areas not commonly associated with science learning become active when people complete physics problems.

Source: Drexel University.

Parts of the brain not traditionally associated with learning science become active when people are confronted with solving physics problems, a new study shows.

The researchers, led by Eric Brewe, PhD, an associate professor in Drexel University’s College of Arts and Sciences, say this shows that the brain’s activity can be modified by different forms of instruction.

Using fMRI (functional magnetic resonance imaging) to measure blood flow in the brain, the researchers looked to map what areas become active when completing a physics reasoning task, both before a course on the concepts and after.

“The neurobiological processes that underpin learning are complex and not always directly connected to what we think it means to learn,” Brewe said of the findings, which were published in Frontiers in ICT.

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