Heart attack risk higher in those who sleep too little or too much

Heart attack risk higher in those who sleep too little or too much

The right amount of sleep is protective of heart health. This was the conclusion of new research that found sleep duration can influence a person’s risk of heart attack, regardless of other heart risk factors, including genetic ones.

New research tracks sleep duration and a person’s risk of a heart attack.

In a recent Journal of the American College of Cardiology paper, scientists from the United States and the United Kingdom describe how they analyzed sleep habits and medical records of 461,347 people aged 40–69 years living in the U.K.

The data, which came from the UK Biobank, included self-reports of how many hours participants habitually slept per night and health records covering 7 years. It also included results of tests for risk genes.

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It’s never too late to start exercising

It’s never too late to start exercising

Summary: Older people who have never participated in resistance exercise programs have a similar ability to build mass muscles as those who frequently exercise and are of similar age. Researchers say that it doesn’t matter whether or not you have exercised throughout your life, starting late can still have excellent health benefits.

Source: University of Birmingham

Older people who have never taken part in sustained exercise programs have the same ability to build muscle mass as highly trained master athletes of a similar age, according to new research at the University of Birmingham.

The research shows that even those who are entirely unaccustomed to exercise can benefit from resistance exercises such as weight training.

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3 Secret Tactics for Dealing with Difficult People

3 Secret Tactics for Dealing with Difficult People

Difficult people can inhabit (and intrude into) many areas of our lives: work, home, neighborhood, social and professional affiliations, even at the sanctuary of the gym! Whether someone acts defensive, rude, passive-aggressive, critical, or lies and then turns things around, difficult people have something in common: they are frustrating to deal with.

In an already stressful world, having to interact with difficult people can take its toll, especially when those challenging people are family, co-workers, bosses, or neighbors (in other words, people who you have to see on a continuous basis). However, there are some tactics that may help you keep your sanity — and sense of control — intact. Listed below are some of my personal favorites that have helped me.

Have a Clear Goal

Over two decades ago, I was visiting my dear friend Amy, who was dying of lung cancer. Even though I was there to take care of her, she decided to give me a gift that I still use to this day and will continue to do so for the rest of my life. The gift was a simple but powerful sentence: “When you have to confront someone, make sure to have a clear goal in mind.” (Kindhearted and thoughtful Amy knew that I had to deal with a number of difficult people). Driving away from her house on that brisk Autumn afternoon, I found myself nodding my head in agreement.

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Computer use in midlife may prevent cognitive decline

Computer use in midlife may prevent cognitive decline

Researchers found that using a computer, playing games, and participating in social activities may reduce the risk of mild cognitive impairment.

Our brains go through changes as we get older, and some people may experience issues with memory, thinking, or judgment.

Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is the stage between age-related cognitive decline and dementia — however, MCI does not significantly affect daily life and activities.

People with MCI tend to forget things, lose their train of thought or the thread of conversations, and feel overwhelmed by making decisions. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), more than 16 million people in the United States are living with cognitive impairment.

MCI may increase the risk of dementia, but not everyone with MCI goes on to develop the condition. To date, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have not approved any treatments specifically for MCI.

Lifestyle choices such as physical exercise and intellectual stimulation have positive effects on the brain. In recent years, researchers have been conducting more studies to find treatments that may prevent cognitive decline.

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Iatrogenic Disease: The 3rd Most Fatal Disease in the USA

Iatrogenic Disease: The 3rd Most Fatal Disease in the USA

Iatrogenic Disease is defined as a disease that is caused by medical treatment. Read major headlines around the globe on this serious disease.

How Prepared are You to Not Become a National Statistic?

If a Jumbo Jet crashed and killed 280 people everyday… 365 days a year… year after year… would you be concerned about flying??

Would you question the Federal Aviation Administration? Would you demand answers??

Think about it!

Close to 100,000 people dying every year from plane crashes?

Sounds Ridiculous??!!

Well think again. What if you were told that over 100,000 people are killed and over 2 million people maimed and disabled every year…year after year from modern medicine…would you believe it??

Well these may be my words…but read the following articles from the most respected medical journals and institutions (Journal of the American Medical Association, Harvard University, Centers for Disease Control, British medical journal The Lancet, New England Journal of Medicine and national news (New York Times, Washington Post, CNN, US World Report) and you be the judge.

Writing in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), Dr. Starfield has documented the tragedy of the traditional medical paradigm in the following statistics:

Iatrogenic Disease: The 3rd Most Fatal Disease in the USA

* The term iatrogenic is defined as “induced in a patient by a physician’s activity, manner, or therapy. Used especially to pertain to a complication of treatment.” Furthermore, these estimates of death due to error are lower than those in a recent Institutes of Medicine report.

If the higher estimates are used, the deaths due to iatrogenic causes would range from 230,000 to 284,000.

Even at the lower estimate of 225,000 deaths per year, this constitutes the third leading cause of death in the U.S.

Dr. Starfield offers several caveats in the interpretations of these numbers:

First, most of the data are derived from studies in hospitalized patients.

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Why do people laugh in their sleep?

Why do people laugh in their sleep?

Laughing during sleep, or hypnogely, is relatively common and is not usually anything to worry about. In most cases, researchers believe that the cause is laughing at a dream during rapid eye movement sleep, which is entirely harmless.

In some cases, sleep laughing has links to sleep disorders. In rare cases, hypnogely can be a symptom of a neurological disorder.

Although Sigmund Freud and other prominent psychoanalysts have attributed sleep laughing to an unconscious manifestation of primal instincts and fears, experts dismiss this theory as not being entirely credible. Is it normal?

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Time for Understanding Time in the Brain

Time for Understanding Time in the Brain

“Time is passing too fast!” Many of us use that phrase every day when we feel like our kids are growing up fast or when a deadline sneaks up on us. When Virginie van Wassenhove hears that phrase, it conjures an entirely different point of view. She goes straight to consciousness, musing on how we perceive reality.

“When it comes to time, we tend to use linguistic shortcuts that may abuse the state of reality and fundamentally bias the way we think about time and the way scientists conceptualize issues related to time,” she says. “I am interested in understanding how the slow time scales of squishy matter afford us to assign meaning to reality.”

A cognitive neuroscientist at CEA and INSERM in Paris, van Wassenhove is working to understand the neural underpinnings of time. She has organized a symposium on the topic at the Cognitive Neuroscience Society (CNS) annual meeting in San Francisco this month — featuring scientists who are exploring evidence of how we construct mental models of time. Click to read

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